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kqedscience:

64 Percent of Women Scientists Say They’ve Been Sexually Harassed Doing Field Work
“Most women working in the sciences face sexual assault and harassment while conducting field work, according to a study released Wednesday that is the first to investigate the subject.
The report surveyed 516 women (and 142 men) working in various scientific fields, including archeology, anthropology, and biology. Sixty-four percent of the women said they had been sexually harassed while working at field sites, and one out of five said they had been victims of sexual assault. The study found that the harassers and assailants were usually supervisors. Ninety percent of the women who were harassed were young undergraduates, post-graduates, or post-doctoral students.”
Read more from motherjones.

kqedscience:

64 Percent of Women Scientists Say They’ve Been Sexually Harassed Doing Field Work

Most women working in the sciences face sexual assault and harassment while conducting field work, according to a study released Wednesday that is the first to investigate the subject.

The report surveyed 516 women (and 142 men) working in various scientific fields, including archeology, anthropology, and biology. Sixty-four percent of the women said they had been sexually harassed while working at field sites, and one out of five said they had been victims of sexual assault. The study found that the harassers and assailants were usually supervisors. Ninety percent of the women who were harassed were young undergraduates, post-graduates, or post-doctoral students.”

Read more from motherjones.

neurosciencestuff:

Mutation stops worms from getting drunk
Neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.
The scientists accomplished this feat by inserting a modified human alcohol target into the worms, as reported this week in The Journal of Neuroscience.
"This is the first example of altering a human alcohol target to prevent intoxication in an animal," says corresponding author, Jon Pierce-Shimomura, assistant professor in the university’s College of Natural Sciences and Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research.
An alcohol target is any neuronal molecule that binds alcohol, of which there are many.
One important aspect of this modified alcohol target, a neuronal channel called the BK channel, is that the mutation only affects its response to alcohol. The BK channel typically regulates many important functions including activity of neurons, blood vessels, the respiratory tract and bladder. The alcohol-insensitive mutation does not disrupt these functions at all.
"We got pretty lucky and found a way to make the channel insensitive to alcohol without affecting its normal function," says Pierce-Shimomura.
The scientists believe the research has potential application for treating people addicted to alcohol.
"Our findings provide exciting evidence that future pharmaceuticals might aim at this portion of the alcohol target to prevent problems in alcohol abuse disorders," says Pierce-Shimomura. "However, it remains to be seen which aspects of these disorders would benefit."
Unlike drugs such as cocaine, which have a specific target in the nervous system, the effects of alcohol on the body are complex and have many targets across the brain. The various other aspects of alcohol addiction, such as tolerance, craving and the symptoms of withdrawal, may be influenced by different alcohol targets.
The worms used in the study, Caenorhabditis elegans, model intoxication well. Alcohol causes the worms to slow their crawling with less wriggling from side to side. The intoxicated worms also stop laying eggs, which build up in their bodies and can be easily counted.
Unfortunately, C. elegans are not as ideal for studying the other areas of alcohol addiction, but mice make an excellent model. The modified human BK channel used in the study, which is based on a mutation discovered by lead author and graduate student Scott Davis, could be inserted into mice. These modified mice would allow scientists to investigate whether this particular alcohol target also affects tolerance, craving and other symptoms relevant to humans.
Pierce-Shimomura speculated that their research could even be used to develop a ‘James Bond’ drug someday, which would enable a spy to drink his opponent under the table, without getting drunk himself. Such a drug could potentially be used to treat alcoholics, since it would counteract the intoxicating and potentially addicting effects of the alcohol.

neurosciencestuff:

Mutation stops worms from getting drunk

Neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.

The scientists accomplished this feat by inserting a modified human alcohol target into the worms, as reported this week in The Journal of Neuroscience.

"This is the first example of altering a human alcohol target to prevent intoxication in an animal," says corresponding author, Jon Pierce-Shimomura, assistant professor in the university’s College of Natural Sciences and Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research.

An alcohol target is any neuronal molecule that binds alcohol, of which there are many.

One important aspect of this modified alcohol target, a neuronal channel called the BK channel, is that the mutation only affects its response to alcohol. The BK channel typically regulates many important functions including activity of neurons, blood vessels, the respiratory tract and bladder. The alcohol-insensitive mutation does not disrupt these functions at all.

"We got pretty lucky and found a way to make the channel insensitive to alcohol without affecting its normal function," says Pierce-Shimomura.

The scientists believe the research has potential application for treating people addicted to alcohol.

"Our findings provide exciting evidence that future pharmaceuticals might aim at this portion of the alcohol target to prevent problems in alcohol abuse disorders," says Pierce-Shimomura. "However, it remains to be seen which aspects of these disorders would benefit."

Unlike drugs such as cocaine, which have a specific target in the nervous system, the effects of alcohol on the body are complex and have many targets across the brain. The various other aspects of alcohol addiction, such as tolerance, craving and the symptoms of withdrawal, may be influenced by different alcohol targets.

The worms used in the study, Caenorhabditis elegans, model intoxication well. Alcohol causes the worms to slow their crawling with less wriggling from side to side. The intoxicated worms also stop laying eggs, which build up in their bodies and can be easily counted.

Unfortunately, C. elegans are not as ideal for studying the other areas of alcohol addiction, but mice make an excellent model. The modified human BK channel used in the study, which is based on a mutation discovered by lead author and graduate student Scott Davis, could be inserted into mice. These modified mice would allow scientists to investigate whether this particular alcohol target also affects tolerance, craving and other symptoms relevant to humans.

Pierce-Shimomura speculated that their research could even be used to develop a ‘James Bond’ drug someday, which would enable a spy to drink his opponent under the table, without getting drunk himself. Such a drug could potentially be used to treat alcoholics, since it would counteract the intoxicating and potentially addicting effects of the alcohol.

wnyc:

5-Foot-Tall Kacy Catanzaro Is The First Woman To Finish The ‘American Ninja Warrior’ Course.

Actually, totally, amazing and worth watching the whole way through.

-Jody, BL Show-

(h/t Digg)

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nodyslexia:

Crystals of Hen Egg White Lysozyme

jtotheizzoe:

Painting Macromolecules
In this day and age, we take for granted that complex molecular structures are deduced on an almost daily basis. There are entire scientific journals devoted to such structures, and the now-routine techniques used to solve them, with tongue-tying names like x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Calculating the pattern of folds in a protein is now a minor blip on the scientific radar, when in years past you could be guaranteed a cover article.
Of course, it wasn’t always this way. In 1961, Irving Geis illustrated the first protein structure solved by X-ray crystallography: sperm whale myoglobin. Today we use computers and automated algorithms to translate complex data sets into the ribbons and sheets of protein structures. But Geis painted it by hand, working closely with the scientists who created the data.
Check out more of Geis’ work and a history of molecular structures at The Scientist.

jtotheizzoe:

Painting Macromolecules

In this day and age, we take for granted that complex molecular structures are deduced on an almost daily basis. There are entire scientific journals devoted to such structures, and the now-routine techniques used to solve them, with tongue-tying names like x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Calculating the pattern of folds in a protein is now a minor blip on the scientific radar, when in years past you could be guaranteed a cover article.

Of course, it wasn’t always this way. In 1961, Irving Geis illustrated the first protein structure solved by X-ray crystallography: sperm whale myoglobin. Today we use computers and automated algorithms to translate complex data sets into the ribbons and sheets of protein structures. But Geis painted it by hand, working closely with the scientists who created the data.

Check out more of Geis’ work and a history of molecular structures at The Scientist.

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

(Source: youtube.com, via jodieee)

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